Photo By: Sydney Martinez

Photo By: Sydney Martinez

Photo By: Sydney Martinez

Photo By: Sydney Martinez

Fish Lake Valley Hot Springs

One of the most euphoric hot springs in Nevada, surrounded by amazing panoramic views of Nevada’s tallest peak and free campsites to be enjoyed by all? Sounds like a Nevada adventure slam-dunk.

Address:
FISH LAKE VALLEY HOT SPRINGS
[REFERENCE GPS COORDINATES]
DYER, NV 89010

What’s the best way to celebrate bagging Boundary, Nevada’s tallest peak? By soaking in pure serenity as you gaze across the valley at that rugged beast. We’re talking about none other than Fish Lake Valley Hot Springs, friends.

If this sounds like something you want to do, you’re in luck. This slice of heaven is located not far from Tonopah, just off of highway 6.  It’s a stones throw away from Bureau of Land Management property, but is owned and operated by Esmeralda County and considered to be a public amenity that is available to all. The main source has an impressive flow and pipes into an established concrete pool complete with a stepladder and handrails. If that’s not cushy enough for your remote Nevada hot spring getaway, visitors will find a concrete patio and wooden benches as well. While most Nevada hot springs can comfortably hold a few adults, the pool at Fish Lake Valley can accommodate a group as it’s 7 x 2 feet and roughly 3 feet deep. Plus, the tub overflows into two warm ponds, making an optimal swimming retreat in summer months.

This beautiful marsh also promises some cool birding and wildlife spotting opportunities. Sure, a lake being named Fish Lake might not be out of the ordinary, but the fish that call Fish Lake Valley home are, in fact special. Yep, keep your eyes peeled for large schools of GOLDFISH scooting around in the warm ponds year round.

Best yet, make your excursion to this remote gem a weekend getaway by bagging Boundary and camping overnight at Fish Lake Valley Hot Springs. Or, plan on camping out there and using Fish Lake Valley as a home base for off-roading to the nearby ghost towns of Silver Peak, Blair and Candelaria.

This one is in the top five of most awesome Nevada hot springs for sure. The temperature here is usually pretty consistent, sitting around 105 degrees in the tub. You can’t go wrong with a dip at Fish Lake Valley any time of year, but the area is particularly enjoyable in spring and fall months. 

GETTING THERE

From Tonopah, head north on US Highway 95. This portion of highway coming out of Tonopah is also known as Highway 6. Follow Highway 95/6 for 40.4 miles until you reach the Coaldale junction. Hang a left here, continuing on Highway 6 toward NV-773 South. Travel approximately 6 miles and turn left onto NV-773 South. Once you’re on NV-773, travel for 10.5 miles until you reach NV-264 south. Stay on NV-264 South for 5.8 miles. Here, you’ll see an old ranch house. Turn left [so you’re headed eastbound again] and travel for about 6 more miles until reaching the spring.

NOTEWORTHY TIDBIT

Whether you decide to visit a well-known hot spring or attempt to venture to a lesser-known geothermal zone, be sure to follow a few tips to keep yourself and others around you safe.

Always, ALWAYS test the temperature before getting into a natural hot spring. Even well-known springs can drastically change temperatures, so testing the water each time will ensure you don’t step into a spring that’s too hot. A food thermometer works well for testing.

  • Always be sure to bring a proper vehicle with enough gas to make it to and from your destination, as well as plenty of extra food and water in case you have vehicle trouble. Often times Nevada hot springs are located in remote areas. Be sure to bring a detailed map and let people know where you’re going before embarking.
  • While falling ill from swimming in hot springs are extremely rare, there is still a possibility that it could happen. Some hot springs contain organisms that could be harmful to humans. It may be a good idea to keep your head above water at all times.
  • Please pick up any trash you bring to a hot spring. A much-anticipated soak in nature can be tainted by a spring riddled with trash and broken glass.
  • Because of potential slippery or sharp rocks and occasional broken glass, a pair of sturdy water shoes is recommended before stepping in. Teva sandals are ideal.

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